Kindle Ebook review: All the Gear, No Idea by Michele Harrison

By | March 11, 2016

It’s surprisingly difficult to find honest people nowadays.

By honest I don’t mean I’ll-return-your-cash-filled-wallet type honest, I don’t mean outward honesty, what I’m talking about is being honest about yourself, and being honest with yourself.

With social media, it’s so easy to project yourself to be something you’re clearly not, but the real danger is going so deep with your lie that you actually start believing it. I hate people who take themselves too seriously, and let praise or criticism get to them.

We are all a smudge of zombie stardust waiting to disintegrate back into the ground.

Michele Harrison contacted me a while back via Email. It’s weird getting Emails nowadays, it’s kinda like getting actual physical mail from a postman. She had written a book about her solo motorcycle trip through India in 1997, and wanted me to take a look at it.

I’m not used to being treated nicely for my writing.

It was a surprise for me for sure, but like with most things in life I said, what the hell. She sent in a PDF version.

I was done with it in 3 days.

As with listening to Guy Martin’s autobiography, Michele’s book gives you that feeling of being genuine, being human, being able to accept your issues and maybe even laugh about them. That’s a serious problem with a lot of people that I see nowadays, people so hell-bent on shoving the best 5% of their lives down everyone’s throats that they completely forget how to smile when the shit hits the fan, which it always does.

It’s not your perfect story of a woman looking to find freedom and finding it on a bed of roses with a man with 8-pack abs and a bucket of ice cream. The woman was 33 when she did it, had no experience with motorcycles, and yet decided to ride a fucking Royal Enfield, through all of India.

All 27,359 kilometers of it.

It sometimes saddens me that bloody foreigners have seen more of my country than I have, and seen it more closely, felt it better, lived it more in a few months than I have lived in my 28 years. Having said that, I wouldn’t have wanted to see India in 1997, that too on a Royal Enfield, on non-existent roads, and a rather tense time.

If you want to be inspired for your next adventure, if you want to be humbled, if you want to connect with those most basic instincts that push us to sit on top of a motorcycle and see the world, this is for you.

Even though this is a Kindle Ebook, you don’t really need to buy the Kindle device. Download the free Kindle app on your phone, or even on your desktop, and you are all ready for the virtual adventure.

And it’s all yours for just 100 Rupees, or $1.46 or £3.99.